Canadian Mining Journal

Feature

Five Simple Steps to Safety

For decades, a simple recipe has helped to improve safety in underground mines in Ontario and around the world. Introduced by Neil George in 1942, the Five-Point Safety System is a step-by-step approach to eliminating hazards and fostering a com-...


For decades, a simple recipe has helped to improve safety in underground mines in Ontario and around the world. Introduced by Neil George in 1942, the Five-Point Safety System is a step-by-step approach to eliminating hazards and fostering a com- mitment to safety. What are the five points?

1. Check the entrance to the place of work.

2.Are working place and equipment in good order?

3.Are people working properly?

4. Do an act of safety.

5.Can, and will, people continue to work properly?

The new 22-page A Pocket Guide to the Five Point Safety System produced by the Mines and Aggregates Safety and Health Association makes an ideal introduction to the system or a refresher for those already familiar with the five points. It outlines each of the steps, and discusses the role that conditions, attitudes and methods play in accidents. It also offers a checklist for companies seeking to administer and apply the system in their workplaces.

The guide will be especially useful for supervisors, who play a critical role in making sure the system works.

22 pages

Paperback, $5 each for MASHA members;

$15 for non-members

Mines & Aggregates Safety & Health Association

690 McKeown Ave.

North Bay, ON, P1B 9P1

(705) 474-7233 ext.279

www.masha.on.ca


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3 Comments » for Five Simple Steps to Safety
  1. Nikki Hetherington says:

    How effect is this system with above ground mining? I would think quite effective. I have used the 5 point system in underground mines, and would like to implement it for the above ground mine I am currently working at. We are also still under construction at this mine, so there are a few factors which come into play.

  2. Craig Kaufman says:

    I worked underground for less than a year as one of the Hard Rock Mining Students in the late ’90s and still use it in many unrelated industries to this day. If at the very least, it gets you thinking of safety….

  3. Mark Moffatt says:

    The Neil George 5 Point Safety System was in place back in the late 70’s in Elliot Lake when I was there. We have moved to a few differnt types of Safety Systems since then but I think they all hinge around Neil George Safety System. We have used acronyms such as CAM (Conditions, Attitude and Method), SUPA (See, Understand, Plan and ACT), SLAM ( Stop, Look Access and Manage). Number 5 of the N.G.S.S. is here today but the twist is ZERO Harm. Can we achieve Zero Harm? I believe we can achieve this, when people stop saying “It’s mining of course people will get hurt” and start saying “I will not accept people getting hurt in the work place”. We can change this one Safety Meeting at a time , one Person at a time.

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