Canadian Mining Journal

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The election is over, now what?

Now that the federal election is over and the campaign promises slowly fade away, it's now our time to start a campaign of our own to remind the elected officials why we put them in power to run, not ruin, this country.


Now that the federal election is over and the campaign promises slowly fade away, it’s now our time to start a campaign of our own to remind the elected officials why we put them in power to run, not ruin, this country.

The difference between “run” and “ruin” is the simple letter “i” and it’s now our job to remind our representatives of the promises they made to us when they said: “If “I” am elected, “I” will promise to do what “I” can to get this country back on its feet (or whatever they promised “I” would do).

In any event, and especially now with so much new blood sitting in the house, I think we, as individuals and companies in particular, should get on their backs right away and not be complacent about the fact that we just spent another $300 million to give them power over us.

In fact, I think they owe us and unless we start flooding them with constant reminders of how important our needs are to them, and how important we are to them in general, most of those elected will simply go to Ottawa with a political smugness knowing they’ll probably be in power for at least the next four years and it’s time to get comfortable.

And that’s what bugs me the most. Unlike most Canadians, I’ve actually attended a Session of Parliament in Ottawa and quite honestly, “smug” is using it lightly when it comes to describing how many of our elected officials behave when in session. Childish is more like it!

You’ve probably seen “Live from Parliament Hill” telecasts on television but it’s what the cameras don’t show on the air that tells the real make-up and character of many of our Electorate.

Unless it’s their cue to speak or they know they’re within the camera’s sight lines, most of them are giggling with others or they’re just waiting to join in the routine heckling that far too many of them view as an “acceptable” behaviour.

Quite frankly, it’s pretty hard to swallow, especially when you’re there in person and not at home where you can change the channel.

I’ve even attended a Private Members meeting and believe me, the arrogance and grand standing that goes on behind those closed doors is even more sickening.

Again, it’s childish, and now that I’m older than probably 90 per cent of the people elected to run this country, I can comfortably say these “kids” need to show more respect for the people who gave them the power and privilege to represent them.

On a more personal note to mining, one of Mr. Harper’s main platforms was “stability” and as we all know, the mining industry could certainly use some. With the appointment of Joe Oliver to Minister of Natural Resources, he is now the seventh minister in the past nine years to hold that position and it’s time for that revolving door to stop. The country cannot afford to have such an important sector of the Canadian economy run by a temporary leader.

We need a steady and accountable hand to guide the growth of industry both within Canada and around the world.

And while on the topic of accountability, that’s probably my biggest beef about politicians because just prior to any election, they’re everywhere, in your face at every opportunity, but once in power, many of them disappear and are no shows in Parliament because they’re out with their constituents.

Out

doing what is my question and we all deserve answers but unless we ask, we probably won’t hear much more than wise-cracks from the hecklers for the next four years.


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