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SURVEY: Hays predicts fewer fulltime mining jobs

TORONTO - According to the fifth annual Hays Canada sglary Guide, more than half of Canadian mining and resource employers expect to grow their business in 2015, but only a third intend to boost permanent headcount.



TORONTO – According to the fifth annual Hays Canada sglary Guide, more than half of Canadian mining and resource employers expect to grow their business in 2015, but only a third intend to boost permanent headcount.

Although the mining industry has had to adjust hiring plans as a result of the global downturn, the Hays survey found it too, along with all other industries, is very optimistic about growth. Employers also have to contend with a tug-of-war over skilled tradespeople who are in high demand forcing many companies to rely on temporary workers.

Overall, the Hays report suggests that mining and resource business targets in 2015 and beyond could be undermined if more permanent recruitment, training and retention solutions aren’t found.

The survey, conducted in November 2014, found that 53% of Canadian mining and resource companies anticipate increasing business activity in the coming months. However, only 34% will add to permanent staff levels. A further 20% are actually planning to cut staff, a move that threatens productivity and increasing stress levels among existing workers. Many employers (40%) plan to address these issues by increasing temporary staff levels rather than focusing on permanent positions with long term career growth potential.

Forty per cent of employers in the mining and resource industry say skill shortages affect business activity however, many of the contributing factors are within their control. More than a quarter of respondents acknowledge that fewer people are entering the industry. This mirrors attitudes across all employment sectors as well as the general opinion that employers have a responsibility to boost volumes of qualified graduates by promoting themselves and their industries at the post-secondary level.

A quarter of employers also say their lack of training and professional development contributes to their skills shortage issue.

In an effort to attract top talent, 59% of mining and resource employers rely on competitive salary packages; however, forestry employers struggle to match salaries offered by mining companies. Forestry companies therefore need to establish competitive recruitment strategies to attract talent.

Despite unpredictable markets worldwide, responses from Canada’s mining and resource employers show that the majority (83%) of employers plan to offer some form of salary increase in 2015 and more than a quarter (33%) believe that the country’s economy will continue to strengthen throughout the next six to12 months.

Click this link to learn more about Hays Canada’s salary survey.


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