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ROTTERDAM CONVENTION – Chrysotile Producers Breathe Easier

SWITZERLAND - The decision was announced in Geneva that under the terms of the Rotterdam Convention, chrysotile fib...


SWITZERLAND – The decision was announced in Geneva that under the terms of the Rotterdam Convention, chrysotile fibre will not be included in the Prior Informed Consent (PIC) Procedure. The convention requires companies that export listed hazardous substances to obtain the prior informed consent of importers before trade proceeds. The Rotterdam Convention became legally binding on Feb. 24, 2004.

As the president of the CHRYSOTILE INSTITUTE, Clement Godbout stated after the meetings in Geneva, this is a very important decision for the international chrysotile industry. “Finally, the world seems to differentiate the five types of asbestos: amosite, actinolite, anthophyllite, tremolite, and chrysotilethe latter being the only fibre exploited and showing no unacceptable risk for human health when correctly used, contrary to the four other fibres," he declared.

"The refusal to include chrysotile to the PIC procedure is also a great show of faith by the Canadian government towards the populations of Asbestos and Thetford Mines regions. By objecting to the inclusion of chrysotile, these numerous producing and consuming countries have indicated to the whole world that this natural fibre can, and is, being used safely and responsibly. In addition, Canada also assumes its role as an international leader by offering to emerging countries which have a great need, a product which is safe, durable and comparatively inexpensive," said Godbout.

The Chrysotile Institute in Montreal promotes a policy of responsible and safe use of this natural fibre that has unique qualities and is economical, compared with its substitutes. Learn more about its work at www.chrysotile.com.


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