Canadian Mining Journal

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BASE METALS: Santa Fe discovered two SEDEX targets near old Sullivan mine

BRITISH COLUMBIA – Where better to hunt elephants than in elephant country? That question was often asked during the 10 decades the Sullivan zinc-lead mine operated. Teck closed it due to depleted resources in 2001, but Santa Fe Metals...



BRITISH COLUMBIA – Where better to hunt elephants than in elephant country? That question was often asked during the 10 decades the Sullivan zinc-lead mine operated. Teck closed it due to depleted resources in 2001, but Santa Fe Metals Corp., a Vancouver junior, is hunting nearby, 27 km east of Kimberly.

Field work at Santa Fe’s Sully project has lead to the identification of two large, vertical and parallel sedimentary exhalative (SEDEX) targets. Both the east and west targets are located within the broad 4 by 3 km Sully gravity anomaly, said the company. Portions of the property have been drill tested, but investigations are in their earliest stages.

The company is closely studying the local geology. It said, “The complex interplay of folding and faulting, and the subsequent rotation are interpreted to have caused local repeats, or en echelon recurring beds of the now vertical stratigraphy. This concept provides a very useful explanation for the mechanical evolution of the East and West masses. They may have been an initially flat lying SEDEX deposit that has been folded, faulted into two large portions and ultimately rotated into the parallel and proximal targets identified now by coincident geophysical anomalies described above.”

The website SantaFeMetals.com was under construction at press time, but check back for further information when it goes live.


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